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Calhoun-Eaton Pit_Dec2018 Calhoun-Eaton Pit M-1981-029 December 2018 AMENDMENT TO THE 112C PERMIT TO THE COLORADO DIVISION OF RECLAMATION, MINING, AND SAFETY By: United Companies PREPARED BY: TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction EXHIBIT A ................................................................................... LEGAL DESCRIPTION EXHIBIT B ............................................................................................................ INDEX MAP EXHIBIT C ....................................................... PREMINE AND MINE PLAN MAPS EXHIBIT D ...................................................................................................... MINING PLAN EXHIBIT E ................................................................................... RECLAMATION PLAN EXHIBIT F .................................................................................. RECLAMATION MAPS EXHIBIT G ............................................................................... WATER INFORMATION EXHIBIT H ........................................................................ WILDLIFE INFORMATION EXHIBIT I ................................................................................... SOILS INFORMATION EXHIBIT J ................................................................ VEGETATION INFORMATION EXHIBIT K .......................................................................... CLIMATE INFORMATION EXHIBIT L ................................................................................ RECLAMATION COSTS EXHIBIT M ........................................................ OTHER PERMITS AND LICENSES EXHIBIT N ........................................... SOURCE OF LEGAL RIGHT TO ENTER EXHIBIT O ............................................................. OWNERS OF AFFECTED LAND AND SUBSTANCE TO BE MINED EXHIBIT P ......................................... MUNICIPALITIES WITHIN TWO MILES EXHIBIT Q PROOF OF MAILING OF NOTICES TO THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS AND SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT EXHIBIT R ..................... PROOF OF FILING WITH COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER EXHIBIT S ....................................... PERMANENT MAN-MADE STRUCTURES RULE 1.6.2(1)(B) GEOTECHNICAL STABILITY EXHIBIT APPENDIX 1 – SOIL REPORT APPENDIX 2 – MAPS Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 i-1 Introduction The Calhoun-Eaton Pit has been mined since the 1970’s and has exhausted its reserves. The western portion of the site, where the concrete plant is located, has been converted to an industrial yard and was released from the reclamation permit area prior to 1996. The eastern portion of the site was sold to Eagle County and Sierra Trail Investments and this area is still under the reclamation permit. Eagle County has converted its portion of the permit area for use as a recreation area, the Eagle River Preserve. Sierra Trail Investments has reclaimed its portion of the permit area to an industrial yard as per approved Eagle County land use. This amendment is to change the post mining land use from pasture to recreation and industrial yard in order to comply with the scope of reclamation that has been completed. Approval of this amendment to the permit will facilitate a complete release from the reclamation permit which was applied for on June 22, 2018. Deviations from the approved Reclamation Plan, including water features installed by Eagle County in the Eagle River Preserve, will be addressed in this amendment. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 A-1 EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION The site is located within the community of Edwards, Colorado, a census-designated place in Eagle County, Colorado. A legal description is shown on Map C-1 which is included in Appendix 2. A general location map is enclosed in Exhibit B which indicates the mine entrance in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates in meters. 1. Legal Description - permit boundaries The Calhoun – Eaton Pit is located approximately ½ to 1 mile west- southwest of I-70 Exit 163 in part of the West Half (W 1/2) of the Northeast Quarter (NE ¼) of the Southeast Quarter (SE ¼) of the Northwest Quarter (NW ¼) of Section 5, Township 5 South, Range 82 West, 6th Principal Meridian (PM), Eagle County, Colorado. The pit is situated at an approximate elevation of 7200 feet. More particularly as follows: With the west section line of Section 5 serving as the basis of bearing at N01°58’41” E; from the east quarter corner of Section 5, T5S, R82W of the 6th PM, N 76°24'20" E a distance of 1402.30', to the point of beginning; thence N 02°48'07" E a distance of 349.03'; thence N 85°51'51" W a distance of 163.59'; thence N 01°13'29" E a distance of 704.07'; thence S 86°14'39" E a distance of 291.74'; thence S 85°42'39" E a distance of 351.66'; thence N 53°31'00" E a distance of 484.31'; thence N 89°45'07" E a distance of 139.20'; thence S 74°11'12" E a distance of 343.66'; thence N 04°54'34" E a distance of 187.89'; thence N 87°07'26" E a distance of 160.90'; thence S 64°25'37" E a distance of 142.33'; thence S 16°56'40" E a distance of 446.71'; thence S 46°19'49" E a distance of 205.56'; thence S 65°29'57" E a distance of 142.37'; thence S 03°21'54" W a distance of 552.77'; thence S 02°17'21" W a distance of 535.65'; thence N 87°34'48" W a distance of 680.47'; thence N 75°52'39" W a distance of 963.77'; thence N 75°58'02" W a distance of 428.02'; which is the point of beginning, Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 A-2 having an area of 66.07 acres more or less. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 B-1 EXHIBIT B INDEX MAP Figure 1 Location/ Index Map of the Calhoun-Eaton Pit approximately 1 mile west of the town of Edwards, Colorado. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 C-1 EXHIBIT C PREMINE AND MINE PLAN MAPS Map C-1 Baseline Conditions The baseline conditions of the Calhoun-Eaton Pit are detailed in Map C-1 located in Appendix 2. Map C-2 Mine Plan Since mining is complete, there is no mine plan map. See Map F-1 for the current and final conditions of the site. Map C-3 Cross Sections Perpendicular cross-sections for the Calhoun-Eaton Pit were produced, see Map C-3 located in Appendix 2. . Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 D-1 EXHIBIT D MINING PLAN 1. General Mining Plan and Methods The Calhoun-Eaton Pit has been mined since the 1970’s and has exhausted its reserves. No mining or processing is conducted on site. Reclamation is complete. The site has had a number of owners over time with the final owner whom operated mining and processing on the site being United Companies. The land owners are now Eagle County and Sierra Trail Investments. The final land use is changing from pasture to recreation and an industrial yard, which is reflected in the amendment to the reclamation permit. 2. Earthmoving Mining and processing on the permit area have ceased and as such, no earthmoving is planned or will occur. 3. Water Information, Diversions, Impoundments, Rights and Augmentation All water rights issues such as availability of water for this operation, consumption rates, dust control, etc. are presented in Exhibit G - Water Information. 4. Size of worked areas Mining and processing on the permit area have ceased and as such, no areas are being or will be worked. 5. Mining Timetable Table D-1 Mining Timetable Years Activity Present Mining and Processing Complete 6. Deposit Description. Mining and processing on the permit area have ceased. The deposit exploited during mining consisted of unconsolidated sand and gravel. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 D-2 7. Primary and Secondary Commodities. Mining and processing on the permit area have ceased. The primary and secondary commodities exploited during mining and processing operations consisted of sand and gravel utilized mainly as construction materials. 8. Incidental Products. Mining and processing on the permit area have ceased. No incidental products were produced during mining and processing operations. 9. Explosives. Mining and processing on the permit area have ceased. No explosives are being, or will be, used. 10. Mine Facilities and Operation No mining facilities, processing facilities, or equipment remain within the permit boundary. 11. Schedule of Operations All mining and processing operations have ceased. 12. Eagle County Impacts and Environmental Impacts There will be no impacts to Eagle County from mining and processing operations as these activities have ceased. There will be no impacts to the environment from mining and processing operations as these activities have ceased. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 E-1 EXHIBIT E RECLAMATION PLAN 1. General Reclamation Plan including Types of Reclamation The total area of the permit is 66.00 acres. The majority of the site, 62 acres, has been reclaimed by the current owner, Eagle County, to recreational use. The northwest 4 acres of the permit area, owned by Sierra Trail Investments, has been reclaimed to an industrial yard. Eagle County imported fill material to lessen the slopes of the site to 3H:1V ratio or shallower and to provide funding for the creation of the Eagle River Preserve. Phase 1 of the Preserve was completed as of June 2008. Phases 2A was completed in 2009 and 2B was completed in 2010 as additional fill material and funding became available. All three phases were similar in scope, design, and execution. The remaining northwest corner of the site has been reclaimed to an industrial yard, as that is the desire of the current landowner, Sierra Trail Investments. The breakdown of reclamation areas onsite is as follows: four aces of industrial yard and 62 acres of rangeland for recreational use. 2. Comparison to Lands in Vicinity. The reclamation of the preponderance of the permit area to recreational use, with an additional four acres being reclaimed to a small industrial yard, is consistent with the adopted local and state land use in the immediate vicinity. 3. Implementation of Reclamation Plans. Reclamation of the permit area is complete and DRMS have found no violations or issues with the reclamation. All reclamation performance standards, as outlined in Section 3.1 of the ‘Mineral Rules and Regulations of the Colorado Mined Land Reclamation Board for the Extraction of Construction Materials’ promulgated October, 1995 have been met. 4. Reclamation Timetable and Sequence Table E-2 Reclamation Timetable Years Activity Present Reclamation Complete 5. Final Grading Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 E-2 All mining and processing operations have ceased. All slopes have been graded to 3H:1V ratio or shallower. 6. Seeding Seeding schedule for Eagle County’s portion of the permit area reclaimed to recreation use was a dryland grass seed mix and enhanced native turf mix installed as follows; Blue Gramma - 20%, Buffalograss – 20%, Sideoats Geramma – 15%, Galleta Grass – 15%, Prairie Junegrass – 5%, Western Wheatgrass – 20%, Blue Aster – 5%. Revegetation and seeding was not required on the Sierra Trails Investment property that has been reclaimed to an industrial yard. 7. Fertilization Eagle County purchased the majority of the permit area and reclaimed it to recreational use. The reclamation is complete and fertilization, if needed, is now the responsibility of the current landowner. Fertilization was not required on the Sierra Trails Investment property that has been reclaimed to an industrial yard. 8. Revegetation Rangeland The 62 acres of the permit area that is on the property owned by Eagle County has been reclaimed to rangeland as part of a park. The entire permit area has been revegetated with the approved seed mix and plantings. The seed mix is detailed in Exhibit E-6, ‘Seeding’. The existing vegetation community as installed by Eagle County on that portion of the permit area converted to recreational use consists of native grasses, wetland perennials, deciduous canopy trees, deciduous shrubs, willow cuttings, evergreen trees, and evergreen shrubs. A listing of all perennials, shrubs, and trees, including quantities and as built locations for the Eagle River Preserve, can be found in the attached example Landscape Plans from Norris Design. Industrial Yard The four acres of the permit area that is on the Sierra Trail Investments property has been reclaimed to an industrial yard. This is in alignment with the approved land use in Eagle County. 9. Topsoiling Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 E-3 10. Topsoil was replaced to a thickness of 6-12 inches on the portion of the permit owned by Eagle County and reclaimed to recreational use. The portion of the permit area that is on the Sierra Trail Investments property has been reclaimed to an industrial yard and as such the replacement of topsoil is not required.Post-Reclamation Site Drainage The site currently has a stormwater discharge permit and will hold this permit until the DRMS releases the site from reclamation liability. In general, the site drains north to the river. There are a few small ponds shown on the Conceptual Landscape Plan of the Eagle River Preserve which were installed by Eagle County after Eagle County purchased the site. Eagle County has sufficient water supply to augment the water losses from this surface water evaporation. Eagle County’s water right to cover all uses on their property can be provided by the County upon request by DRMS. The portion of the site owned by Sierra Trail Investments and reclaimed to an industrial yard handles all stormwater discharge according to their own permits and plans. 11. Weed Control The weed control plan for the Calhoun-Eaton Pit is attached to this amendment. A July 11, 2018 inspection of the site by the Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety found that noxious weeds, such as Musk Thistle and Oxeye Daisy, were sparsely populated throughout the site. The Division recommended managing these weeds through yearly weed spraying. As the owners of the site are now Eagle County and Sierra Trail Investments, United Companies will no longer be conducting weed control on the site and weed control is now the responsibility of Eagle County and Sierra Trail Investments. This area of Eagle County is known to have weeds of concern such as thistle, knapweed, and others. United Companies had taken extreme care in preventing weeds from establishing infestations in the permit area by doing the following: Each mid-April, a noxious weed survey was made of the permit area. If any patches or plants have been identified, they were sprayed by backpack sprayer or 4-wheeler using chemicals approved for use by the weed control staff of Eagle County. This was done within 2 weeks after the inspection when the weeds are most vulnerable. Care was taken to spot spray where possible to avoid killing desirable broadleaf plants. After reclamation of portions of the site and after final reclamation, weed surveys and spraying will continue until the perennial cover and production of the site have met DRMS requirements and bond release has been obtained. These weed control measures are now the responsibility of the current owners. The Division and Eagle County weed Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 E-4 control staff will be consulted regarding a weed infestation area and any control measures prior to their initiation. 12. Revegetation Success Criteria Revegetation will be deemed adequate when erosion is controlled, and the vegetation is considered satisfactory according to Division standards. A July 11, 2018 inspection of the site by the Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety found no problems or violations in regards to the revegetation. The portion of the permit area that is on the Sierra Trail Investments property has been reclaimed to an Industrial Yard. This portion of the reclamation is complete and is not contingent upon revegetation as a criterion for success. 13. Monitoring Reclamation Success Modifications to the reclamation plan are not anticipated, as reclamation is complete and the latest DRMS inspection identified no problems or violations. Monitoring the reclamation on an ongoing basis will ensure its success. The reclaimed land has demonstrated a capacity to control erosion. If minor changes or modifications are needed to the seeding and reclamation plan, revision plans will be submitted to the Division. It is hoped that the Division will provide assistance in evaluating the success of the ongoing reclamation process. 14. Spill Prevention and Reporting No fuel storage takes place on the portion of the site reclaimed to park use as mining and reclamation are complete, therefore no fuel spills are possible. 15. Haul Roads and Access There are two access points for the site. United Companies used the mine entrance to the west to access the site during mining and processing operations. After reclamation was completed, and the site was sold to Eagle County, an access was established from the roundabout on US Highway 6 & 24 as shown on the Landscape Plan. Sierra Trail Investments portion of the permit has been reclaimed to an industrial yard and is accessed from US Highway 6 & 24 on the western end of the property using the traditional mine entrance. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 F-1 EXHIBIT F RECLAMATION MAPS Map F-1 Reclamation Plan indicates final grades, and final use of permit area and is attached to this permit application. All maps can be found in Appendix 2. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 G-1 EXHIBIT G WATER INFORMATION 1. General United Companies operated the Calhoun Eaton Pit in accordance with a stormwater permit issued from the Colorado Department of Health Water Quality Control Division. The owner, Eagle County, is operating the site under current Colorado Water Rights law. 2. Surface and Groundwater After the cessation of mining and processing operations, the site was sold to Eagle County and to Sierra Trail Investments. Drainage was modified to conform with the Conceptual Landscape Design for the Eagle River Preserve on the Eagle County property. See Map F-1 in Exhibit C for locations of all tributary water courses, wells, springs, stock water ponds, reservoirs, and ditches on the affected lands. Drainage on the permitted and reclaimed area is generally from the south of the site to the north, with excess water flowing into the Eagle River. A 4-foot-deep sedimentation pond is located on the southeastern corner of the Eagle County property which intercepts an intermittent stream that flows into the permit area. A series of ponds with wetland shelfs and basins were also constructed on the portion of the site reclaimed to the Eagle River Preserve. The ponds do not exceed 1.5 feet in depth and are surrounded by wetland shelfs designed to have statured soils but to not have standing water under normal conditions. Pond spillway outlets and inter-pond channels are rock lined in order to minimize erosion. All areas of the Eagle County property have been graded in order to achieve positive drainage. The portion of the site owned by Sierra Trail Investments and reclaimed to an industrial yard handles all stormwater discharge according to their own permits and plans. Percolation and groundwater resource testing were not required for the operation of the Calhoun- Eaton pit. No permanent deleterious effects to groundwater were observed during mining and processing operations at the pit and as such, none are anticipated in the future as all mining and processing operations have ceased. The current use of the site as a recreational facility and industrial yard is not anticipated to affect the groundwater in a deleterious way. 3. Aquifers There are no known aquifers in the permit area. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 G-2 4. De-watering Operations and Runoff from Disturbed Areas Mining and processing have ceased on the site. No de-watering operations are occurring or are planned. All of the permit area has been reclaimed, as such there is no run-off from disturbed areas to be managed. 5. Water Requirements for the Operation and Water Rights Mining operations and processing have been completed and therefore no water will be required or consumed by these activities. There are no water diversions from the Eagle River. Water rights are currently owned by Eagle County for use on their property. A pond on the Eagle County property was constructed in 2008. The pond operation on site was neither a source of water for nor was created by the mining operations. Eagle County now owns and operates this pond within Colorado’s water rights system. A copy of the pertinent water rights may be requested by DRMS from the current owner of the permit area, Eagle County. If the pond stores or evaporates water out of priority, the Water Commissioner would regulate the release of storage to prevent injury during a downstream senior water rights call. It is the opinion of Eagle County that no water rights augmentation plan or other arrangement need be implemented as a condition for United Companies to secure release of its reclamation obligation and any bond. 6. Water Sources Mining and processing have ceased and the permit area has been reclaimed, therefore no sources of water will be required for mining or reclamation. 7. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) Permit Mining and processing have ceased and the permit area has been reclaimed, therefore no NPDES permit is required. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 H-1 EXHIBIT H WILDLIFE INFORMATION 1. Significant Wildlife Resources on the Affected Lands Significant game resources are not present on the site. Significant non-game resources are not present on the site. 2. Seasonal Use of Affected Lands The site has traditionally been utilized as pasture. The 62 acres of the site has been converted to year-round recreational use by the current owner, Eagle County. The northwest portion of the site comprising four acres has been reclaimed and converted to an industrial yard by the current owner, Sierra Trail Investments. 3. Presence and Estimated Population of Threatened or Endangered Species in the Area. Threatened or endangered species from either the Federal or the State lists are not present on the site. 4. General Effects of the Operation on the Existing Wildlife of the Area Mining has occurred on this site since the 1960’s during which time wildlife have become conditioned and adjusted to the activities. With the cessation of mining and processing on the site, wildlife will generally be unaffected on the site. 5. Fish Resources The Eagle River passes through the northern boundary of the site. This area of the river provides excellent rafting and fishing opportunities. The area is pristine and the mining area is not generally visible to rafters passing through. Anecdotal evidence from local professional river guides note that this section of the river contains some of the best fishing in Eagle County. Mining and reclamation activities are complete onsite, so there is no risk to the fishing resources. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 I-1 EXHIBIT I SOILS INFORMATION There are six types of natural soil either on the site itself or covering surrounding lands. These soils vary in depth from 0 to 4 feet. The depth of salvage during mining operations was highly variable and ranged from 3 or 4 inches to as much as 12 to 18 inches in places near the south boundary of the property. The mining operation salvaged soil to return the irrigated field to its current condition. A protective cover of western wheatgrass was planted on topsoil stockpiled for any length of time. Topsoil was replaced during the reclamation process to a depth of 6-12 inches on the portion of the site owned by Eagle County and reclaimed to recreational use. As per the approved land use, topsoil was not required to be replaced on the portion of the permit area converted to an industrial yard. A custom soil survey for the permit area is found in APPENDIX 1 – SOIL REPORT. Soils are shown on Map C-1. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 J-1 EXHIBIT J VEGETATION INFORMATION 1. Present Vegetation Types Mining and processing have been completed and the site is reclaimed. Eagle County reclaimed their portion of the site in three phases; 1, 2a, and 2b each being installed with a similar vegetation community. The existing vegetation community as installed by Eagle County on that portion of the permit area converted to recreational use consists of native grasses, wetland perennials, deciduous canopy trees, deciduous shrubs, willow cuttings, evergreen trees, and evergreen shrubs. A complete listing of all perennials, shrubs, and trees, including quantities and as built locations for the Eagle River Preserve, can be found in the attached example Landscape Plans from Norris Design. As per Norris Design, the dryland grass seed mix and enhanced native turf mix installed is as follows; Blue Gramma - 20%, Buffalograss – 20%, Sideoats Geramma – 15%, Galleta Grass – 15%, Prairie Junegrass – 5%, Western Wheatgrass – 20%, Blue Aster – 5%. Revegetation was not required on the Sierra Trails Investment property that has been reclaimed to an industrial yard. 2. Relationship of Present Vegetation to Soil Types All vegetation types are compatible with the soil types and conditions found at the permit area. 3. Crop and Hay Production The permit area has been reclaimed to recreation and industrial yard use, therefore there will be no hay or crop production. 4. Vegetation Relationships to Topography Please see the Landscape Plans as supplied by Norris Designs, and Map F-1 ‘Reclamation Map’ in Exhibit C for the relation of the types of vegetation to existing topography. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 K-1 EXHIBIT K CLIMATE INFORMATION 1. General Information The Calhoun-Eaton pit is situated at an approximate elevation of 7200 feet. The climate is semi- arid and averages 46.7 inches of snow with 11.3 inches of melted liquid equivalent precipitation annually. The average annual temperature is 44.5° F. Temperatures fall below freezing much of the time in November through March. Precipitation occurs on average 3-5 days per month. The site is classified as USDA Zone 5a, with an average growing season of approximately 180 days from April 15 to October 15. Wind velocities average 6 miles per hour with occasionally high velocity gusts and are prevailing from the west and northwest. Strong winds during the spring months may cause rapid drying of the soil surface. Table K-1 Climate Data of Eagle, Colorado1 Average Temperature (F) Average Precipitation (in) Maximum Minimum Total precip. Total snow January 32.4 10.1 0.5 6.5 February 37.9 16.8 0.5 7.3 March 47.2 25.8 0.8 5.4 April 56.6 31 1.2 3.6 May 67.3 38.3 1 1.1 June 77.6 44.3 0.7 0 July 83.1 51.3 1.5 0 August 81.5 50.5 0.8 0 September 72.7 42.1 1.4 0.3 October 60.3 31.8 1.2 2.8 November 44.4 21.9 0.9 8 December 32.8 12.5 0.8 11.7 Yearly (avg) (58) (31) 11.3 46.7 1 Approximately 12 miles west of the Calhoun-Easton Pit (source: https://www.weather-us.com/en/colorado- usa/eagle-climate https://www.wunderground.com/history). Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 L-1 EXHIBIT L RECLAMATION COSTS Reclamation is complete at the site. Eagle County has completed the conversion of the portion of the site that it owns to recreational use. Sierra Trail Investments has completed the conversion of the portion of the site that it owns to an industrial yard. No further tasks remain and no further reclamation costs are anticipated. The current bond for the Calhoun-Eaton pit as of September 11, 2018, is $134,900.00 Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 M-1 EXHIBIT M OTHER PERMITS AND LICENSES The following permits and licenses were necessary for the full operation of the Calhoun-Eaton Pit and are attached to this permit amendment: 1. Eagle County Special Use Permits Zs-23-76, Zs-130-81, and Zs-131-81 amended by AM-01 1996 ‘Submittal to Amend Special Use Permit Zs-131-81’. 2. Air Permit issued by the Air Pollution Control Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. 3. Water quality Control Commission Stormwater Discharge Permit. 4. Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan. No other permits or licenses were required for the operation of the mining and processing. Mining and processing have ceased and the permit area has been sold and reclaimed, therefore no new permits or licenses will be required. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 N-1 EXHIBIT N SOURCE OF LEGAL RIGHT TO ENTER The surface owners of the property are Eagle County and Sierra Trial Investments. A tipping fee agreement is enclosed with this permit amendment which constituted the source of United Companies legal right to enter and to conduct reclamation activities. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 O-1 EXHIBIT O OWNERS OF AFFECTED LAND AND SUBSTANCE TO BE MINED The mined substance was sand and gravel. No other lands will be affected by the operation. The surface and mineral owners of the property are:Eagle County 500 Broadway PO Box 850 Eagle, Colorado. 81631 And Sierra Trail Investments LLC 122 W Timber Draw Edwards Colorado 81632-6009 Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 P-1 EXHIBIT P MUNICIPALITIES WITHIN TWO MILES The community of Edwards, Colorado, a census-designated place in Eagle County, Colorado, is located approximately 1 mile east of the Calhoun-Easton Pit and is the only municipality within two miles of the Pit. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 Q-1 EXHIBIT Q PROOF OF MAILING OF NOTICES TO THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS AND SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT Notices were filed with the Eagle Board of Commissioners and the Board of Supervisors of the Local Conservation District, Eagle County District in support of this permit amendment. Proof of the mailing of the required notices is attached. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 R-1 EXHIBIT R PROOF OF FILING WITH COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER A return receipt from the Eagle County Clerk indicating the date on which the application was placed with the County Clerk and Recorder for public viewing is attached to this permit amendment. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 S-1 EXHIBIT S PERMANENT MAN-MADE STRUCTURES All mining and processing have ceased at the permit area and as such no significant, valuable, and permeant man-made structures located within 200 feet of the affected land will be adversely affected. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 RULE-1 RULE 1.6.2(1)(B) Prior to the submittal of the application, a sign was erected at the entrance to the site which contained all the required information regarding Rule 1.6.2(1)(b). Please see attached sign certification. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 GS-1 GEOTECHNICAL STABILITY EXHIBIT No excavation will be conducted as part of the proposed amendment, so no geotechnical stability exhibit is applicable. Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 APPENDIX 1 – SOIL REPORT United States Department of Agriculture A product of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies, State agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local participants Custom Soil Resource Report for Aspen-Gypsum Area, Colorado, Parts of Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin Counties Calhoun Eaton Natural Resources Conservation Service December 4, 2018 Preface Soil surveys contain information that affects land use planning in survey areas. They highlight soil limitations that affect various land uses and provide information about the properties of the soils in the survey areas. Soil surveys are designed for many different users, including farmers, ranchers, foresters, agronomists, urban planners, community officials, engineers, developers, builders, and home buyers. Also, conservationists, teachers, students, and specialists in recreation, waste disposal, and pollution control can use the surveys to help them understand, protect, or enhance the environment. Various land use regulations of Federal, State, and local governments may impose special restrictions on land use or land treatment. Soil surveys identify soil properties that are used in making various land use or land treatment decisions. The information is intended to help the land users identify and reduce the effects of soil limitations on various land uses. The landowner or user is responsible for identifying and complying with existing laws and regulations. Although soil survey information can be used for general farm, local, and wider area planning, onsite investigation is needed to supplement this information in some cases. Examples include soil quality assessments (http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/ portal/nrcs/main/soils/health/) and certain conservation and engineering applications. For more detailed information, contact your local USDA Service Center (https://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/app?agency=nrcs) or your NRCS State Soil Scientist (http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/contactus/? cid=nrcs142p2_053951). Great differences in soil properties can occur within short distances. Some soils are seasonally wet or subject to flooding. Some are too unstable to be used as a foundation for buildings or roads. Clayey or wet soils are poorly suited to use as septic tank absorption fields. A high water table makes a soil poorly suited to basements or underground installations. The National Cooperative Soil Survey is a joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies, State agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local agencies. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) has leadership for the Federal part of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. Information about soils is updated periodically. Updated information is available through the NRCS Web Soil Survey, the site for official soil survey information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or a part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require 2 alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 3 Contents Preface....................................................................................................................2 How Soil Surveys Are Made..................................................................................5 Soil Map..................................................................................................................8 Soil Map................................................................................................................9 Legend................................................................................................................10 Map Unit Legend................................................................................................12 Map Unit Descriptions........................................................................................12 Aspen-Gypsum Area, Colorado, Parts of Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin Counties...................................................................................................14 38—Evanston loam, 1 to 6 percent slopes..................................................14 92—Redrob loam, 1 to 6 percent slopes.....................................................15 107—Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 1 to 6 percent slopes, extremely s..16 108—Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 6 to 12 percent slopes, extremely...18 109—Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 12 to 25 percent slopes, extremely..............................................................................................19 120—Water.................................................................................................21 References............................................................................................................22 4 How Soil Surveys Are Made Soil surveys are made to provide information about the soils and miscellaneous areas in a specific area. They include a description of the soils and miscellaneous areas and their location on the landscape and tables that show soil properties and limitations affecting various uses. Soil scientists observed the steepness, length, and shape of the slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of crops and native plants; and the kinds of bedrock. They observed and described many soil profiles. A soil profile is the sequence of natural layers, or horizons, in a soil. The profile extends from the surface down into the unconsolidated material in which the soil formed or from the surface down to bedrock. The unconsolidated material is devoid of roots and other living organisms and has not been changed by other biological activity. Currently, soils are mapped according to the boundaries of major land resource areas (MLRAs). MLRAs are geographically associated land resource units that share common characteristics related to physiography, geology, climate, water resources, soils, biological resources, and land uses (USDA, 2006). Soil survey areas typically consist of parts of one or more MLRA. The soils and miscellaneous areas in a survey area occur in an orderly pattern that is related to the geology, landforms, relief, climate, and natural vegetation of the area. Each kind of soil and miscellaneous area is associated with a particular kind of landform or with a segment of the landform. By observing the soils and miscellaneous areas in the survey area and relating their position to specific segments of the landform, a soil scientist develops a concept, or model, of how they were formed. Thus, during mapping, this model enables the soil scientist to predict with a considerable degree of accuracy the kind of soil or miscellaneous area at a specific location on the landscape. Commonly, individual soils on the landscape merge into one another as their characteristics gradually change. To construct an accurate soil map, however, soil scientists must determine the boundaries between the soils. They can observe only a limited number of soil profiles. Nevertheless, these observations, supplemented by an understanding of the soil-vegetation-landscape relationship, are sufficient to verify predictions of the kinds of soil in an area and to determine the boundaries. Soil scientists recorded the characteristics of the soil profiles that they studied. They noted soil color, texture, size and shape of soil aggregates, kind and amount of rock fragments, distribution of plant roots, reaction, and other features that enable them to identify soils. After describing the soils in the survey area and determining their properties, the soil scientists assigned the soils to taxonomic classes (units). Taxonomic classes are concepts. Each taxonomic class has a set of soil characteristics with precisely defined limits. The classes are used as a basis for comparison to classify soils systematically. Soil taxonomy, the system of taxonomic classification used in the United States, is based mainly on the kind and character of soil properties and the arrangement of horizons within the profile. After the soil 5 scientists classified and named the soils in the survey area, they compared the individual soils with similar soils in the same taxonomic class in other areas so that they could confirm data and assemble additional data based on experience and research. The objective of soil mapping is not to delineate pure map unit components; the objective is to separate the landscape into landforms or landform segments that have similar use and management requirements. Each map unit is defined by a unique combination of soil components and/or miscellaneous areas in predictable proportions. Some components may be highly contrasting to the other components of the map unit. The presence of minor components in a map unit in no way diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the data. The delineation of such landforms and landform segments on the map provides sufficient information for the development of resource plans. If intensive use of small areas is planned, onsite investigation is needed to define and locate the soils and miscellaneous areas. Soil scientists make many field observations in the process of producing a soil map. The frequency of observation is dependent upon several factors, including scale of mapping, intensity of mapping, design of map units, complexity of the landscape, and experience of the soil scientist. Observations are made to test and refine the soil-landscape model and predictions and to verify the classification of the soils at specific locations. Once the soil-landscape model is refined, a significantly smaller number of measurements of individual soil properties are made and recorded. These measurements may include field measurements, such as those for color, depth to bedrock, and texture, and laboratory measurements, such as those for content of sand, silt, clay, salt, and other components. Properties of each soil typically vary from one point to another across the landscape. Observations for map unit components are aggregated to develop ranges of characteristics for the components. The aggregated values are presented. Direct measurements do not exist for every property presented for every map unit component. Values for some properties are estimated from combinations of other properties. While a soil survey is in progress, samples of some of the soils in the area generally are collected for laboratory analyses and for engineering tests. Soil scientists interpret the data from these analyses and tests as well as the field-observed characteristics and the soil properties to determine the expected behavior of the soils under different uses. Interpretations for all of the soils are field tested through observation of the soils in different uses and under different levels of management. Some interpretations are modified to fit local conditions, and some new interpretations are developed to meet local needs. Data are assembled from other sources, such as research information, production records, and field experience of specialists. For example, data on crop yields under defined levels of management are assembled from farm records and from field or plot experiments on the same kinds of soil. Predictions about soil behavior are based not only on soil properties but also on such variables as climate and biological activity. Soil conditions are predictable over long periods of time, but they are not predictable from year to year. For example, soil scientists can predict with a fairly high degree of accuracy that a given soil will have a high water table within certain depths in most years, but they cannot predict that a high water table will always be at a specific level in the soil on a specific date. After soil scientists located and identified the significant natural bodies of soil in the survey area, they drew the boundaries of these bodies on aerial photographs and Custom Soil Resource Report 6 identified each as a specific map unit. Aerial photographs show trees, buildings, fields, roads, and rivers, all of which help in locating boundaries accurately. Custom Soil Resource Report 7 Soil Map The soil map section includes the soil map for the defined area of interest, a list of soil map units on the map and extent of each map unit, and cartographic symbols displayed on the map. Also presented are various metadata about data used to produce the map, and a description of each soil map unit. 8 9 Custom Soil Resource Report Soil Map 438970043898004389900439000043901004390200438970043898004389900439000043901004390200362300 362400 362500 362600 362700 362800 362900 363000 363100 363200 362300 362400 362500 362600 362700 362800 362900 363000 363100 39° 39' 4'' N 106° 36' 20'' W39° 39' 4'' N106° 35' 40'' W39° 38' 43'' N 106° 36' 20'' W39° 38' 43'' N 106° 35' 40'' WN Map projection: Web Mercator Corner coordinates: WGS84 Edge tics: UTM Zone 13N WGS84 0 200 400 800 1200 Feet 0 50 100 200 300 Meters Map Scale: 1:4,400 if printed on A landscape (11" x 8.5") sheet. Soil Map may not be valid at this scale. MAP LEGEND MAP INFORMATION Area of Interest (AOI) Area of Interest (AOI) Soils Soil Map Unit Polygons Soil Map Unit Lines Soil Map Unit Points Special Point Features Blowout Borrow Pit Clay Spot Closed Depression Gravel Pit Gravelly Spot Landfill Lava Flow Marsh or swamp Mine or Quarry Miscellaneous Water Perennial Water Rock Outcrop Saline Spot Sandy Spot Severely Eroded Spot Sinkhole Slide or Slip Sodic Spot Spoil Area Stony Spot Very Stony Spot Wet Spot Other Special Line Features Water Features Streams and Canals Transportation Rails Interstate Highways US Routes Major Roads Local Roads Background Aerial Photography The soil surveys that comprise your AOI were mapped at 1:24,000. Warning: Soil Map may not be valid at this scale. Enlargement of maps beyond the scale of mapping can cause misunderstanding of the detail of mapping and accuracy of soil line placement. The maps do not show the small areas of contrasting soils that could have been shown at a more detailed scale. Please rely on the bar scale on each map sheet for map measurements. Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: Coordinate System: Web Mercator (EPSG:3857) Maps from the Web Soil Survey are based on the Web Mercator projection, which preserves direction and shape but distorts distance and area. A projection that preserves area, such as the Albers equal-area conic projection, should be used if more accurate calculations of distance or area are required. This product is generated from the USDA-NRCS certified data as of the version date(s) listed below. Soil Survey Area: Aspen-Gypsum Area, Colorado, Parts of Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin Counties Survey Area Data: Version 9, Sep 10, 2018 Soil map units are labeled (as space allows) for map scales 1:50,000 or larger. Date(s) aerial images were photographed: Aug 18, 2012—Oct 13, 2017 The orthophoto or other base map on which the soil lines were compiled and digitized probably differs from the background Custom Soil Resource Report 10 MAP LEGEND MAP INFORMATION imagery displayed on these maps. As a result, some minor shifting of map unit boundaries may be evident. Custom Soil Resource Report 11 Map Unit Legend Map Unit Symbol Map Unit Name Acres in AOI Percent of AOI 38 Evanston loam, 1 to 6 percent slopes 8.3 12.7% 92 Redrob loam, 1 to 6 percent slopes 0.3 0.4% 107 Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 1 to 6 percent slopes, extremely s 26.0 39.5% 108 Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 6 to 12 percent slopes, extremely 27.8 42.2% 109 Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 12 to 25 percent slopes, extremely 3.0 4.5% 120 Water 0.4 0.6% Totals for Area of Interest 65.7 100.0% Map Unit Descriptions The map units delineated on the detailed soil maps in a soil survey represent the soils or miscellaneous areas in the survey area. The map unit descriptions, along with the maps, can be used to determine the composition and properties of a unit. A map unit delineation on a soil map represents an area dominated by one or more major kinds of soil or miscellaneous areas. A map unit is identified and named according to the taxonomic classification of the dominant soils. Within a taxonomic class there are precisely defined limits for the properties of the soils. On the landscape, however, the soils are natural phenomena, and they have the characteristic variability of all natural phenomena. Thus, the range of some observed properties may extend beyond the limits defined for a taxonomic class. Areas of soils of a single taxonomic class rarely, if ever, can be mapped without including areas of other taxonomic classes. Consequently, every map unit is made up of the soils or miscellaneous areas for which it is named and some minor components that belong to taxonomic classes other than those of the major soils. Most minor soils have properties similar to those of the dominant soil or soils in the map unit, and thus they do not affect use and management. These are called noncontrasting, or similar, components. They may or may not be mentioned in a particular map unit description. Other minor components, however, have properties and behavioral characteristics divergent enough to affect use or to require different management. These are called contrasting, or dissimilar, components. They generally are in small areas and could not be mapped separately because of the scale used. Some small areas of strongly contrasting soils or miscellaneous areas are identified by a special symbol on the maps. If included in the database for a given area, the contrasting minor components are identified in the map unit descriptions along with some characteristics of each. A few areas of minor Custom Soil Resource Report 12 components may not have been observed, and consequently they are not mentioned in the descriptions, especially where the pattern was so complex that it was impractical to make enough observations to identify all the soils and miscellaneous areas on the landscape. The presence of minor components in a map unit in no way diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the data. The objective of mapping is not to delineate pure taxonomic classes but rather to separate the landscape into landforms or landform segments that have similar use and management requirements. The delineation of such segments on the map provides sufficient information for the development of resource plans. If intensive use of small areas is planned, however, onsite investigation is needed to define and locate the soils and miscellaneous areas. An identifying symbol precedes the map unit name in the map unit descriptions. Each description includes general facts about the unit and gives important soil properties and qualities. Soils that have profiles that are almost alike make up a soil series. Except for differences in texture of the surface layer, all the soils of a series have major horizons that are similar in composition, thickness, and arrangement. Soils of one series can differ in texture of the surface layer, slope, stoniness, salinity, degree of erosion, and other characteristics that affect their use. On the basis of such differences, a soil series is divided into soil phases. Most of the areas shown on the detailed soil maps are phases of soil series. The name of a soil phase commonly indicates a feature that affects use or management. For example, Alpha silt loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes, is a phase of the Alpha series. Some map units are made up of two or more major soils or miscellaneous areas. These map units are complexes, associations, or undifferentiated groups. A complex consists of two or more soils or miscellaneous areas in such an intricate pattern or in such small areas that they cannot be shown separately on the maps. The pattern and proportion of the soils or miscellaneous areas are somewhat similar in all areas. Alpha-Beta complex, 0 to 6 percent slopes, is an example. An association is made up of two or more geographically associated soils or miscellaneous areas that are shown as one unit on the maps. Because of present or anticipated uses of the map units in the survey area, it was not considered practical or necessary to map the soils or miscellaneous areas separately. The pattern and relative proportion of the soils or miscellaneous areas are somewhat similar. Alpha-Beta association, 0 to 2 percent slopes, is an example. An undifferentiated group is made up of two or more soils or miscellaneous areas that could be mapped individually but are mapped as one unit because similar interpretations can be made for use and management. The pattern and proportion of the soils or miscellaneous areas in a mapped area are not uniform. An area can be made up of only one of the major soils or miscellaneous areas, or it can be made up of all of them. Alpha and Beta soils, 0 to 2 percent slopes, is an example. Some surveys include miscellaneous areas. Such areas have little or no soil material and support little or no vegetation. Rock outcrop is an example. Custom Soil Resource Report 13 Aspen-Gypsum Area, Colorado, Parts of Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin Counties 38—Evanston loam, 1 to 6 percent slopes Map Unit Setting National map unit symbol: jq5t Elevation: 6,500 to 8,000 feet Mean annual precipitation: 13 to 15 inches Mean annual air temperature: 42 to 46 degrees F Frost-free period: 80 to 90 days Farmland classification: Prime farmland if irrigated Map Unit Composition Evanston and similar soils: 85 percent Minor components: 15 percent Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit. Description of Evanston Setting Landform: Valley sides, terraces, alluvial fans Landform position (three-dimensional): Tread Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Mixed alluvium Typical profile H1 - 0 to 14 inches: loam H2 - 14 to 31 inches: clay loam H3 - 31 to 60 inches: loam Properties and qualities Slope: 1 to 6 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Medium Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high (0.20 to 0.60 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: High (about 10.1 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): 4c Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 4c Hydrologic Soil Group: C Ecological site: Deep Loam (R048AY292CO) Other vegetative classification: DEEP LOAM (null_11) Hydric soil rating: No Custom Soil Resource Report 14 Minor Components Other soils Percent of map unit: 15 percent Hydric soil rating: No 92—Redrob loam, 1 to 6 percent slopes Map Unit Setting National map unit symbol: jq7r Elevation: 5,800 to 7,200 feet Mean annual precipitation: 16 to 18 inches Mean annual air temperature: 40 to 44 degrees F Frost-free period: 85 to 105 days Farmland classification: Not prime farmland Map Unit Composition Redrob and similar soils: 85 percent Minor components: 15 percent Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit. Description of Redrob Setting Landform: Terraces, valley floors, flood plains Landform position (three-dimensional): Tread Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Mixed alluvium derived from sandstone and shale Typical profile H1 - 0 to 14 inches: loam H2 - 14 to 20 inches: stratified loamy sand to stony loam H3 - 20 to 60 inches: extremely cobbly loamy sand Properties and qualities Slope: 1 to 6 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Somewhat poorly drained Runoff class: Low Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.60 to 2.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: About 18 to 48 inches Frequency of flooding: Rare Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Salinity, maximum in profile: Nonsaline to very slightly saline (0.0 to 2.0 mmhos/cm) Available water storage in profile: Low (about 4.3 inches) Custom Soil Resource Report 15 Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): 4w Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 4w Hydrologic Soil Group: C Ecological site: River Bottom (R048AY236CO) Other vegetative classification: riverbottom (null_19) Hydric soil rating: No Minor Components Fluvaquents Percent of map unit: 10 percent Landform: Flood plains Hydric soil rating: Yes Other soils Percent of map unit: 5 percent Hydric soil rating: No 107—Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 1 to 6 percent slopes, extremely s Map Unit Setting National map unit symbol: jq4g Elevation: 6,800 to 8,400 feet Mean annual precipitation: 16 to 19 inches Mean annual air temperature: 40 to 43 degrees F Frost-free period: 75 to 95 days Farmland classification: Not prime farmland Map Unit Composition Uracca, moist, and similar soils: 50 percent Mergel and similar soils: 40 percent Minor components: 10 percent Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit. Description of Uracca, Moist Setting Landform: Alluvial fans, structural benches, valley sides Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Mixed alluvium derived from igneous and metamorphic rock Typical profile H1 - 0 to 8 inches: cobbly sandy loam H2 - 8 to 15 inches: very cobbly sandy clay loam H3 - 15 to 60 inches: extremely cobbly loamy sand Properties and qualities Slope: 1 to 6 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Custom Soil Resource Report 16 Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Low Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.20 to 2.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: Very low (about 2.6 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): 6s Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 6s Hydrologic Soil Group: B Ecological site: Stony Loam (R048AY237CO) Other vegetative classification: Stony Loam (null_82) Hydric soil rating: No Description of Mergel Setting Landform: Alluvial fans, structural benches, valley sides Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Glacial outwash Typical profile H1 - 0 to 8 inches: cobbly loam H2 - 8 to 20 inches: very cobbly sandy loam H3 - 20 to 60 inches: extremely stony sandy loam Properties and qualities Slope: 1 to 6 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Very low Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.60 to 6.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: Low (about 3.3 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): 4s Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 4s Hydrologic Soil Group: A Ecological site: Stony Loam (R048AY237CO) Other vegetative classification: Stony Loam (null_82) Hydric soil rating: No Minor Components Other soils Percent of map unit: 10 percent Hydric soil rating: No Custom Soil Resource Report 17 108—Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 6 to 12 percent slopes, extremely Map Unit Setting National map unit symbol: jq4h Elevation: 6,800 to 8,400 feet Mean annual precipitation: 16 to 19 inches Mean annual air temperature: 40 to 43 degrees F Frost-free period: 75 to 95 days Farmland classification: Not prime farmland Map Unit Composition Uracca, moist, and similar soils: 50 percent Mergel and similar soils: 40 percent Minor components: 10 percent Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit. Description of Uracca, Moist Setting Landform: Valley sides, alluvial fans, structural benches Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Mixed alluvium derived from igneous and metamorphic rock Typical profile H1 - 0 to 8 inches: cobbly sandy loam H2 - 8 to 15 inches: very cobbly sandy clay loam H3 - 15 to 60 inches: extremely cobbly loamy sand Properties and qualities Slope: 6 to 12 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Medium Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.20 to 2.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: Very low (about 2.6 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): None specified Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 6e Hydrologic Soil Group: B Ecological site: Stony Loam (R048AY237CO) Other vegetative classification: Stony Loam (null_82) Hydric soil rating: No Custom Soil Resource Report 18 Description of Mergel Setting Landform: Alluvial fans, structural benches, valley sides Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Glacial outwash Typical profile H1 - 0 to 8 inches: cobbly loam H2 - 8 to 20 inches: very cobbly sandy loam H3 - 20 to 60 inches: extremely stony sandy loam Properties and qualities Slope: 6 to 12 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Low Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.60 to 6.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: Low (about 3.3 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): 4s Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 4s Hydrologic Soil Group: A Ecological site: Stony Loam (R048AY237CO) Other vegetative classification: Stony Loam (null_82) Hydric soil rating: No Minor Components Other soils Percent of map unit: 10 percent Hydric soil rating: No 109—Uracca, moist-Mergel complex, 12 to 25 percent slopes, extremely Map Unit Setting National map unit symbol: jq4j Elevation: 6,800 to 8,400 feet Mean annual precipitation: 16 to 19 inches Mean annual air temperature: 40 to 43 degrees F Frost-free period: 75 to 95 days Farmland classification: Not prime farmland Custom Soil Resource Report 19 Map Unit Composition Uracca, moist, and similar soils: 50 percent Mergel and similar soils: 40 percent Minor components: 10 percent Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit. Description of Uracca, Moist Setting Landform: Valley sides, alluvial fans, structural benches Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Mixed alluvium derived from igneous and metamorphic rock Typical profile H1 - 0 to 6 inches: cobbly sandy loam H2 - 6 to 12 inches: very cobbly sandy clay loam H3 - 12 to 60 inches: extremely cobbly loamy sand Properties and qualities Slope: 12 to 25 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Medium Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.20 to 2.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: Very low (about 2.4 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): None specified Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 6e Hydrologic Soil Group: B Hydric soil rating: No Description of Mergel Setting Landform: Alluvial fans, structural benches, valley sides Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Parent material: Glacial outwash Typical profile H1 - 0 to 7 inches: cobbly loam H2 - 7 to 18 inches: very cobbly sandy loam H3 - 18 to 60 inches: extremely stony sandy loam Properties and qualities Slope: 12 to 25 percent Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80 inches Natural drainage class: Well drained Runoff class: Low Custom Soil Resource Report 20 Capacity of the most limiting layer to transmit water (Ksat): Moderately high to high (0.60 to 6.00 in/hr) Depth to water table: More than 80 inches Frequency of flooding: None Frequency of ponding: None Calcium carbonate, maximum in profile: 10 percent Available water storage in profile: Low (about 3.2 inches) Interpretive groups Land capability classification (irrigated): 6e Land capability classification (nonirrigated): 6e Hydrologic Soil Group: A Hydric soil rating: No Minor Components Other soils Percent of map unit: 10 percent Hydric soil rating: No 120—Water Map Unit Composition Water: 95 percent Minor components: 5 percent Estimates are based on observations, descriptions, and transects of the mapunit. Minor Components Aquolls Percent of map unit: 5 percent Landform: Marshes Down-slope shape: Linear Across-slope shape: Linear Hydric soil rating: Yes Custom Soil Resource Report 21 References American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). 2004. Standard specifications for transportation materials and methods of sampling and testing. 24th edition. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). 2005. Standard classification of soils for engineering purposes. ASTM Standard D2487-00. Cowardin, L.M., V. Carter, F.C. Golet, and E.T. LaRoe. 1979. Classification of wetlands and deep-water habitats of the United States. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service FWS/OBS-79/31. Federal Register. July 13, 1994. Changes in hydric soils of the United States. Federal Register. September 18, 2002. Hydric soils of the United States. Hurt, G.W., and L.M. Vasilas, editors. Version 6.0, 2006. Field indicators of hydric soils in the United States. National Research Council. 1995. Wetlands: Characteristics and boundaries. Soil Survey Division Staff. 1993. Soil survey manual. Soil Conservation Service. U.S. Department of Agriculture Handbook 18. http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/ nrcs/detail/national/soils/?cid=nrcs142p2_054262 Soil Survey Staff. 1999. Soil taxonomy: A basic system of soil classification for making and interpreting soil surveys. 2nd edition. Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Handbook 436. http:// www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/soils/?cid=nrcs142p2_053577 Soil Survey Staff. 2010. Keys to soil taxonomy. 11th edition. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. http:// www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/soils/?cid=nrcs142p2_053580 Tiner, R.W., Jr. 1985. Wetlands of Delaware. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Wetlands Section. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Environmental Laboratory. 1987. Corps of Engineers wetlands delineation manual. Waterways Experiment Station Technical Report Y-87-1. United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. National forestry manual. http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/ home/?cid=nrcs142p2_053374 United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. National range and pasture handbook. http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/ detail/national/landuse/rangepasture/?cid=stelprdb1043084 22 United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. National soil survey handbook, title 430-VI. http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/ nrcs/detail/soils/scientists/?cid=nrcs142p2_054242 United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. 2006. Land resource regions and major land resource areas of the United States, the Caribbean, and the Pacific Basin. U.S. Department of Agriculture Handbook 296. http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/soils/? cid=nrcs142p2_053624 United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1961. Land capability classification. U.S. Department of Agriculture Handbook 210. http:// www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs142p2_052290.pdf Custom Soil Resource Report 23 Calhoun-Eaton Pit December 2018 APPENDIX 2 – MAPS 7 2 0 0 ' 7200' 715 0' 7200' 7 2 0 0 '7150'Section 5, T5S R82W EAGLE RIVER EAGLE RIVER US-6 A A' B 165.5' 1ƒ :722.3'1ƒ (291.7' 6ƒ ( 351.7' 6ƒ ( 484. 3' 1ƒ     ( 139.2' 1ƒ ( 343.7' 6ƒ       (167.1'1ƒ (23.6' 1ƒ     ( 130.9' 6ƒ ( 12 8 . 1 ' 6   ƒ       (111.3 '6 ƒ   (106.1'6ƒ  (32.2'6ƒ (94.5'6ƒ (96.7 '6ƒ  (75.9 '6 ƒ   ( 1 3 1 . 4 ' 6   ƒ       ( 10 8 . 3 ' 6   ƒ       (530.8'6ƒ :490.6'6ƒ :70.9' 1ƒ : 231.7' 6ƒ : 387.5' 1ƒ : 629.6' 1ƒ      : 739.6' 1ƒ      :335.3'1ƒ (1413.7' 1ƒ     ( SIERRA TRAIL INVESTMENTS, LLC 122 W TIMBER DRAW EDWARDS, CO 81632 EAGLE COUNTY PO BOC 850 EAGLE, CO 81631 MICHAEL B. EATON 2012 IRREVOCABLE TRUST PO BOX 871 EDWARDS, CO 81632 COLORADO DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION 2829 W HOWARDS PL DENVER, CO 80204 KURT E. VOGELMAN REVOCABLE TRUST PO BOX 806 EDWARDS, CO 81632 EDWARDS WEST END HOLDINGS, LLC 191 N WACKER DR, SUITE 1500 CHICAGO, IL 60606 33601 HIGHWAY 6 LLC 90 HUDSON ST FL 8 JERSEY CITY, NJ 07302 EAGLE COUNTY PO BOC 850 EAGLE, CO 81631 SIERRA TRAIL INVESTMENTS, LLC 122 W TIMBER DRAW EDWARDS, CO 81632 30.7' 6ƒ ( DRMS Permit Number: M1981029 Latitude: 39.64611N Longitude: 106.59881W Major Watershed: Eagle River Mine Entry Location: Map Georeferencing Information:Datum: NAD83 Projection: CO Central Section: 5 Township: 5S Range: 82W File Name: E:\Work\Dropbox\United Companies\Calhoun\Autocad\Calhourn Eaton 181129.dwg Map C-1 Baseline Conditions Calhoun Eaton Pit United Companies State: CO County: Eagle Nearest Town: Edwards PM: 6th Imagery Source: Google Earth Imagery Date: 2016 Drawn by: BEL Checked by: BEL Approved by: BEL Date: 11/14/18 Date: 11/20/18 Date: 11/20/18 Map Scale: 1": 0 Littleton, CO 80123 E-Mail - info@lewicki.biz Greg Lewicki And Associates 3375 W Powers Circle Phone (303)-346-5196 Survey Source: Google Earth 100' 100 200 PERMIT & AFFECTED AREA: 66 ACRES PRE MINE VEGETATION & LAND USE: PASTURE AND MIXED SHRUBS PRE MINE VEGETATION & LAND USE ALONG RIVER: BOTTOMLAND FOREST WET GRASS LAND BOTTOMS OWNER: STATE OF CO US-6 OWNER: 33601 HWY 6 LLC BUILDING FENCE OWNER: B&D LP BUILDING OWNER: KURT VOGELMAN REV. TRUST BUILDING OWNER: SIERRA TRAIL INVESTMENTS LLC CONCRETE FOUNDATION FENCE DRMS Permit Boundary BUILDINGS AND RELATED STRUCTURES Building Airport, paved landing strip, Unpaved landing strip Tanks Located or landmark object BASELINE CONTOURS (USGS) Retaining wall, jetty, or warf 200' Offset of DRMS Permit Boundary Index Approximate of indefinite Intermediate Supplementary Approximate of indefinite LAND INFORMATION Mining claim or property boundary Mining claim or property monument Well (other than water) Fence RIVERS, LAKES, SHORELINES, AND CANALS Perennial stream/ditch Perennial river Intermittent stream/ditch Intermittent river Dam Perennial lake/pond Intermittent lake/pond Dry lake/pond Elevated aqueduct, flume, or conduit Waterwell Spring or seep ROADS AND RELATED FEATURES Roads TRANSMISSION LINES AND PIPELINES Power transmission line; pole; tower Telephone/data line, above ground Pipeline (non-water), above ground Telephone/data line, buried Pipeline (non-water), buried Power transmission line, buried Drainage Basin MINING FEATURES VEGETATION Riverine Vegetation Well Name Feature Label 5280' 5281' Railroad Buried aqueduct, flume, or conduit Well Name runway, taxiway, or apron LEGEND Flood Plain OWNER: EAGLE COUNTY 0+000+200+400+600+801+001+201+401+601+802+002+202+402+602+803+003+203+403+603+804+004+204+404+604+805+005+205+405+605+806+006+206+406+606+807+007+207+407+607+808+008+208+408+608+809+009+209+409+609+8010+0010+2010+4010+6010+8011+0011+2011+4011+6011+8012+0012+2012+4012+6012+8013+0013+2013+4013+6013+8014+0014+2014+4014+6014+8015+0015+2015+4015+6015+8016+0016+2016+4016+6016+8017+0017+2017+4017+6017+8018+0018+2018+4018+6018+8019+0019+2019+4019+6019+8020+0020+2020+4020+6020+8021+0021+2021+4021+6021+8022+0022+2022+4022+6022+8023+0023+2023+4023+6023+8024+0024+2024+4024+6024+8025+007120' 7140' 7160' 7180' 7200' 7220' 7120' 7140' 7160' 7180' 7200' 7220'0+000+200+400+600+801+001+201+401+601+802+002+202+402+602+803+003+203+403+603+804+004+204+404+604+805+005+205+405+605+806+006+206+406+606+807+007+207+407+607+808+008+208+408+608+809+009+209+409+609+8010+0010+2010+4010+6010+8011+0011+2011+4011+6011+8012+0012+2012+4012+6012+8013+0013+2013+4013+6013+8014+0014+2014+4014+6014+8015+0015+2015+4015+6015+8016+0016+2016+4016+6016+8017+0017+2017+4017+6017+8018+0018+2018+4018+6018+8019+0019+2019+4019+6019+807120' 7140' 7160' 7180' 7200' 7220' 7240' 7120' 7140' 7160' 7180' 7200' 7220' 7240' A A' B B' 72 0 0 ' 7200' 7150' 7200' 72 0 0 '7150'7250' EAGLE RIVER EAGLE RIVER US-6 A A' B B' 7220' 7220' 7220'7170' 7190' 719 0 ' 7190' 7180' 7180' 7180' 7170' 7170' 7170'7170'7160' 7160' 7160'7160'7150'7150'7150' 7150' 7210'7210'7210' 7210' 7200' 72 0 0 '7200'7210' 7200'7190' 7180'7170'7160' 71 5 0 '7140'7140'7140' 7140' 7140' 7130' 7130' 7130' 7130' 7130'7130'7220'72 3 0 '7200'722 0 ' 7230' 722 0 ' 721 0 ' 72 1 0 ' 7200' 7200' 7190'7190'7180' 718 0 '7180'7170'7170' 7160' 71 6 0 ' 732 0 ' 7290' 72 8 0 ' 7270 '726 0 ' 725 0 ' 7240' 725 0 '7240'724 0 ' 723 0 '7230' 7220'7220'7170' 71 6 0 ' 7170'7180'71 9 0 ' 7200'7180'7170'7180'7180' 7160' 7150' 7130' 7180' DRMS Permit Number: M1981029 Latitude: 39.64611N Longitude: 106.59881W Major Watershed: Eagle River Mine Entry Location: Map Georeferencing Information:Datum: NAD83 Projection: CO Central Section: 5 Township: 5S Range: 82W File Name: E:\Work\Dropbox\United Companies\Calhoun\Autocad\Calhourn Eaton 181129.dwg Map C-3 Cross Sections Calhoun Eaton Pit United Companies State: CO County: Eagle Nearest Town: Edwards PM: 6th Imagery Source: Google Earth Imagery Date: 2016 Drawn by: BEL Checked by: BEL Approved by: BEL Date: 11/14/18 Date: 11/20/18 Date: 11/20/18 Map Scale: 1": 0 Littleton, CO 80123 E-Mail - info@lewicki.biz Greg Lewicki And Associates 3375 W Powers Circle Phone (303)-346-5196 Survey Source: Google Earth 400 400 800 BASELINE TOPO FROM USGS RECLAIMED FROM LIDAR DISCREPANCIES EXPECTED CROSS SECTIONS SCALE AS SHOWN DRMS Permit Boundary CROSS SECTION ITEMS Baseline (USGS) Reclaimed (Eagle County LIDAR) LEGEND BASELINE TOPO FROM USGS RECLAIMED FROM LIDAR DISCREPANCIES EXPECTED EAGLE RIVER US 6 PARK TURN AROUND FULLY REVEG. SLOPES FULLY REVEG. SLOPES FULLY REVEG. SLOPES SIERRA TRAILS INDUSTRIAL YARD EAGLE COUNTY PRESERVE Section 5, T5S R82W EAGLE RIVER EAGLE RIVER US-6 A A' B 7220' 7220' 7220'7170' 7190' 71 9 0 ' 7190' 7180' 7180' 7180' 7170' 7170' 7170'7170'7160' 7160' 7160'7160'7150'7150'715 0' 7150' 7210'7210'7210' 7210 ' 7200'7200'7200'7180'7140'7140'7140' 7140' 7140' 7130' 7130' 7130' 7130 '7200'72 2 0 ' 721 0 ' 7 2 1 0 ' 7200' 7200' 719 0'7190'7180'7180'7170'7170' 7160' 71 6 0 ' 7170' 7 1 6 0 ' 7170'7180'7 1 9 0 '7200'7 1 8 0 ' 7170'7180'7180' 7160' 7150' 7130' 7180' DRMS Permit Number: M1981029 Latitude: 39.64611N Longitude: 106.59881W Major Watershed: Eagle River Mine Entry Location: Map Georeferencing Information:Datum: NAD83 Projection: CO Central Section: 5 Township: 5S Range: 82W File Name: E:\Work\Dropbox\United Companies\Calhoun\Autocad\Calhourn Eaton 181129.dwg Map F-1 Reclamation Plan Calhoun Eaton Pit United Companies State: CO County: Eagle Nearest Town: Edwards PM: 6th Imagery Source: Google Earth Imagery Date: 2016 Drawn by: BEL Checked by: BEL Approved by: BEL Date: 11/14/18 Date: 11/20/18 Date: 11/20/18 Map Scale: 1": 0 Littleton, CO 80123 E-Mail - info@lewicki.biz Greg Lewicki And Associates 3375 W Powers Circle Phone (303)-346-5196 Survey Source: Google Earth 100' 100 200 PERMIT & AFFECTED AREA: 66 ACRES POST MINE VEGETATION & LAND USE: RECREATION POST MINE VEGETATION & LAND USE ALONG RIVER: RECREATION OWNER: B&D LP BUILDING DRMS Permit Boundary BUILDINGS AND RELATED STRUCTURES Building Airport, paved landing strip, Unpaved landing strip Tanks Located or landmark object BASELINE CONTOURS (USGS) Retaining wall, jetty, or warf 200' Offset of DRMS Permit Boundary Index Approximate of indefinite Intermediate Supplementary Approximate of indefinite LAND INFORMATION Mining claim or property boundary Mining claim or property monument Well (other than water) Fence RIVERS, LAKES, SHORELINES, AND CANALS Perennial stream/ditch Perennial river Intermittent stream/ditch Intermittent river Dam Perennial lake/pond Intermittent lake/pond Dry lake/pond Elevated aqueduct, flume, or conduit Waterwell Spring or seep ROADS AND RELATED FEATURES Roads TRANSMISSION LINES AND PIPELINES Power transmission line; pole; tower Telephone/data line, above ground Pipeline (non-water), above ground Telephone/data line, buried Pipeline (non-water), buried Power transmission line, buried Drainage Basin MINING FEATURES VEGETATION Riverine Vegetation Well Name Feature Label 5280' 5281' Railroad Buried aqueduct, flume, or conduit Well Name runway, taxiway, or apron LEGEND Flood Plain RECLAIMED CONTOURS Index Approximate of indefinite Intermediate Supplementary Approximate of indefinite 5280' 5281' EAGLE COUNTY PARK BUILDINGS POST MINE VEGETATION & LAND USE: INDUSTRIAL YARD